Tucson’s Heirloom Farmer’s Market

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Linda Leigh sells worm castings – that’s polite for worm poop! Is there really a demand for this?

There is at Heirloom Farmers Market in Tucson. Continue reading

Brownville, Nebraska – A Piece of American History

Mark di Suvero's unusual sculpture is a perfect reflection of the whimsy and history inside the Flatwater Folk Art Museum in Brownville, NE

Mark di Suvero’s unusual sculpture is a perfect reflection of the whimsy and history inside the Flatwater Folk Art Museum in Brownville, NE

Brownville, Nebraska has 10 museums.

Now this might not seem odd, but what makes it odd is that this small hamlet has a population of 142. That’s one museum for every 14 residents! Continue reading

Mardi Gras on the Beach in Pensacola

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It’s Mardi Gras and while New Orleans may get the glory, Pensacola, Florida knows how to party. Even the rain didn’t slow the parade in the town of Pensacola when we visited, and when the sun came out on parade day in Pensacola Beach, the party just got better. Continue reading

Look mamacita, I made tamales!

tamaleWhat’s your comfort food?

For British people it might be custard or a full English breakfast of fried eggs and toast with beans, mushrooms, tomatoes and sausages. For French Canadians it might be ragoût de boulettes (meatball stew) or tourtière (meat pie). Americans might long for mom’s apple pie. And Germans for a fat wurst and sauerkraut.

But for Mexicans, it’s tamales. Tamales are composed of masa (corn meal based wet dough) and a filling, wrapped in a corn husk (though in parts of Central America they use a banana leaf). They may be filled with vegetables,  pork, chicken, beef, and even with sugar, cinnamon, cheese and raisins, pineapple, and other fruits. Continue reading

Small Town Perfection – Healdsburg

Healdsburg square orange trees sIt was 1851 and Harmon Heald, like many of California’s first settlers, was looking for gold.

And like most, he found no nuggets. But he built his cabin, and later a general store on the main road between the gold fields and San Francisco. So he found a share in the gold that had already ignited the economy of the recently created state of California.

As his success attracted more settlers to the area, Heald designed the first plaza and laid out the streets that would become the town of Healdsburg. The newcomers quickly discovered that the fertile California soil could grown anything, especially grapes. By the mid-1880s, a flourishing wine industry had already begun to develop, and despite a blip during Prohibition, this region has become one of the world’s premier wine producing regions. In fact, Healdsburg is at the center of three wine areas – Russian River, Dry Creek and Alexander Valley, with plenty of tasting rooms to sample their wines. And where there’s wine, there’s great food. Continue reading